Your Social Security Statement: What’s in It for You?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) provides personalized Social Security Statements to help Americans age 18 and older better understand the benefits that Social Security offers. Your Statement contains a detailed record of your earnings and estimates of retirement, disability, and survivor benefits — information that can help you plan for your financial future.

More than 50 million individuals have established online Social Security accounts.

You can view your Social Security Statement online at any time by creating a my Social Security account at the SSA’s website, ssa.gov/myaccount. If you’re not registered for an online account and are not yet receiving benefits, you’ll receive a Statement in the mail every year, starting at age 60.

Benefit Estimates

Your Social Security Statement tells you whether you’ve earned enough credits by working and paying Social Security taxes to qualify for retirement and disability benefits and, if you qualify, how much you might receive. Generally, retirement benefits are projected for up to nine claiming ages, including full (ages 66 to 67), early (age 62), and late (age 70). If you qualify, you can also see the benefit amount your survivors might receive in the event of your death.

The amounts listed are estimates based on your average earnings in the past and a projection of future earnings. Actual benefits you receive may be different if your earnings increase or decrease in the future.

Amounts may also be affected by other factors, including cost-of-living increases (estimates are in today’s dollars) and other income you receive, and are based on current law.



More than 50 million individuals have established online Social Security accounts.

Source: Social Security Administration, 2021
 


Annual Earnings

In addition to benefit information, your Social Security Statement contains a year-by-year record of your earnings. This record is updated when your employer reports your earnings (or if you’re self-employed, when you report your own earnings). Earnings are generally reported annually, so your most recent earnings may not yet be on your Statement.

Because Social Security benefits are based on average lifetime earnings, it’s important to make sure your earnings have been reported correctly. Compare your earnings record against past tax returns or W-2s. If you find errors, let the Social Security Administration know right away by calling (800) 772-1213.

Your goal may be to fund college education, protect your family during your working years, or guarantee your own retirement security. These things don’t happen by accident. It’s important to determine what you’d like to achieve, and then map out a financial strategy that will help you meet those goals. The good news is that it’s NEVER too late to start! Of course, planning your own financial future can be intimidating. Luckily, you don't have to do it alone. As a New York Life insurance agent, I am a trained Financial Services Professional who can help you identify your financial needs and then determine which insurance and financial products can best help you meet your objectives. Please use my Web site as a resource and contact me for additional information or to schedule a meeting. I look forward to helping you achieve your dreams! Of course, preparinf for your own financial future can be intimidating. Luckily, you don't have to do it alone. As a New York Life insurance agent, I am a trained financial professional who can help you identify your financial needs and then determine which insurance and financial products can best help you meet your objectives. Please use my Web site as a resource and contact me for additional information or to schedule a meeting. I look forward to helping you achieve your dreams!